Laurence Rose

Writer and Conservationist

Now published!

Framing Nature

Conservationist Laurence Rose spent two years exploring the cultural roots of our relationship with the rest of nature in order to map out its future. From the magnificent white-tailed eagles of Orkney and Mull to the fascinating world of ants and crickets on the southern heaths, he describes his encounters with wildlife in exquisite language and vivid detail. Shipping is FREE to UK addresses.

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The Lark Descending

On 29 May, BBC Radio 3’s Sunday evening celebration of all things sonic Between the Ears presents a programme titled The Lark Descending. Presented by Lucy Hodson, it takes the much-loved song of the skylark, and Vaughan Williams’s much-loved orchestral paean to the bird, and places them in their 21st century context. The programme airs a newly commissioned piece by Hinako Omori and includes a contribution from me.

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About Laurence

Laurence Rose is a writer, conservationist and composer. He has worked for the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds since 1983, and since 2017 has helped run a £7 million species recovery project, Back from the Brink. His recent book The Long Spring was published by Bloomsbury in March 2018.

Released 1 June

Leopard Moon Rising

Laurence Rose travelled to India to hear first-hand accounts of indigenous people’s special relationships with the wildlife around them. The Warli people living in the urban forests of Mumbai and the Maldhari pastoralists of Gujarat live harmoniously alongside some of the allegedly most dangerous animals in the world.  In Mumbai, it is the leopard, living at the highest density of any urban big cat population.  In Gujarat’s Gir forest, it is the endangered Asiatic lion, which preys on the herdsmen’s prized buffalo. Rose delves into the values and practicalities that govern life among India’s big cats, discovering that even the tiger is revered as much as it is feared.

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Now published!

Framing Nature

Conservationist Laurence Rose spent two years exploring the cultural roots of our relationship with the rest of nature in order to map out its future. From the magnificent white-tailed eagles of Orkney and Mull to the fascinating world of ants and crickets on the southern heaths, he describes his encounters with wildlife in exquisite language and vivid detail.

Shipping is FREE to UK addresses.

Explore the book →
In stock now

The Long Spring

Laurence Rose spent the spring of 2016 travelling from North Africa to the Arctic coast of North Norway. It was a unique exploration of nature, culture and conservation, and the vital sense of place that cements them together. Each place comes alive through vivid language and finely detailed observation, whether describing landscapes, people or the stunning wildlife of the continent of Europe. Free shipping if bought with Framing Nature.

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Rose is excellent on the science that underpins our understanding of migration, but if he is an environmentalist by profession he is a musician by vocation. His ear for the sounds of birds is exceptional, while his ability to render their spring songs in precise language is among the foremost pleasures of the book.

Mark Cocker

Author and conservationist

No book has made me want to sprout wings and fly quite like Laurence Rose’s modern classic as it chronicles nature’s progress from winter slumber to verdant awakening in language so beautiful it sings.

Stuart Winter

Journalist

As a detailed primer to the world above our heads, The Long Spring makes for an inspiring, eye-opening read.

Oliver Balch

Reviewer

December 2020 - December 2021

Into Light

Now that Framing Nature – conservation and culture is published, and Leopard Moon Rising is finished and being prepared for...

Current projects

I am currently writing and researching a new book, planning a research visit to India and working on various collaborations with other artists who are inspired by nature.

The Lark Descending

On 29 May, BBC Radio 3’s Sunday evening celebration of all things sonic Between the Ears presents a programme titled The Lark Descending. Presented by Lucy Hodson, it takes the much-loved song of the skylark, and Vaughan Williams’s much-loved orchestral paean to the bird, and places them in their 21st century context. The programme airs a newly commissioned piece by Hinako Omori and includes a contribution from me.

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The RSPB 50 years on

One day this week I reached a personal milestone, and the following day I reached another. On 31 January, after...

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E.O. Wilson (10 June 1929 – 26 December 2021)

Edward O. Wilson was an influencer in the true sense - someone whose ideas and ability to communicate them will be valued for decades to come.

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On the road again

At last, the diary has started filling up with real live events and real live audiences. The variety of gigs I have booked this autumn is greater than ever.

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Aarey Forest – victory for art, music and rhythm?

This week, an obscure institution known as the Aarey Dairy Development Corporation handed over 812 acres of forested land wedged between inner-city Mumbai and the hills of the Sanjay Gandhi National Park (SGNP) to the state forest department. If it was not the end of the battle to save Mumbai’s ‘green lung’, it may at least be the beginning of the end.

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The countdown has begun… [updated]

With five months to go before the most important wildlife summit in history, Secretary of State for the Environment George Eustice has signalled his intent, announcing ambitious-sounding plans to restore biodiversity, making it illegal to fail. EXCEPT ....

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Release the leopard!

Leopard Moon Rising, the latest book by Laurence Rose, will be released on 1 June as a paperback, on Kindle and other digital formats.

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If I could have one wish…

…as we continue the countdown to Kunming, it would be for the UK governments to sign up to 30x30… AND REALLY MEAN IT

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